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The Memoirs of Gen. Wm. T. Sherman.jpg (104621 bytes) Memoirs of General William T. Sherman

With a new introduction by William S. Mc Feely.                  

First done in 1984, this enduring book has been republished by De Capo Press. The work is the two volume work done in 1875. Sherman was a natural war general. Good at strategy; relentless in his cause; this book depicts all his strong points and his weaknesses. 409 pages. No index. Softcover. $21.00
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Major General John S. Marmaduke CSA

By Jerry Ponder.

A Good accounting of General Marmaduke and what the author feels was an underlying current of rift between General Price and General Marmaduke, tracing back to earlier political events. Readers can decide if the differences between the two powerful and influencial commanders did actually dictate their actions between battles and throughout their careers. Marmaduke was captured at the Battle of Mine Creek, during Price's ill-fated invasion of Missouri in 1864. Was this by actions of the overall commander or was this just a culmination of tragic mistakes? 300 pages. Indexed. $17.95.                                                                                                                                                    

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READERS NOTICE: This book, will not be reprinted when existing stock is depleted. GET YOURS!

 

The Making of a Missouri Rebel: John Poindexter Webb

By Joanne C. Eakin. A story of her ancestor and his life in Jackson county and the gold-fields of California, continuing through the Civil War years. Soft-cover, 32 pgs, plus index, $6.50                                                                                                                                                     

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The Man Who Wouldn’t Surrender- Even in Death. General J.O. Shelby

Compiled by Carolyn Bartels. As "Taps" was sounded in Forest Hill Cemetery in Kansas City, Missouri, on February 17, 1897, the soldiers who loved him most, paid their respects. A colorful character in the history of Missouri and well acclaimed as the most expert cavalry leader of the Trans-Mississippi, never giving up, and so it was with his struggle with death. Included is family information and the passing of JO’s beloved Betty. From newspaper accounts as collected and preserved by Fred L. Lee. Softcover small booklet, 90 pgs, $9.95                                                                                                                                               

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Ninth Missouri Infantry Regiment, CSA and  12th Missouri Infantry Regiment, CSA

Written by Jerry Ponder. This book takes out the confusions created by the Union army personnel who compiled the Official Records on the two companies. Very good work by Mr. Ponder. 115 pgs, soft-cover, indexed. $12.95                                                                                                                                                   

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Matt Ransom Diary: Confederate General From North Carolina

By Clayton Charles Marlow. Wonderful book. To appreciate fully the Civil War experiences, a good researcher delves into other theaters of operations, searching for the "domino" effect that happenings in a far army can have on one close to home. This is a good work and we recommend it. Hardcover. $24.50 library binding, maps, notes, bibliography section, index. A POWERFUL DIARY.                                                                                                                                                  

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Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border; 1863

By Wiley Britton. This famous book has been around even longer then we have. It is considered the primary source for border rebellion research. Well written and documented. 458 pgs. Softcover $15.95.                                                                                      

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Men_Of_The_Eleventh.jpg (380382 bytes) Men of the Eleventh Missouri Infantry

By Wayne H. Schnetzer.

Includes a sort mini -history of their service. Detailed roster and all data included in for the famous regiment. They were surrendered mainly at Shreveport, La., in May of 1865. Soft-cover, 131 pgs, index. $13.95
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Men_Of_The_Tenth.jpg (373996 bytes) Men of the Tenth: A Roster of the Tenth Missouri Infantry

By Wayne H. Schnetzer.

For the first time an easy to read roster of the men who went all through the war and fought their last battle at Jenkins’ Ferry, Arkansas. They were surrendered at Shreveport, La., in May of 1865. Well researched and documented. Any data appearing has been included. 122 pgs, soft-cover, and well indexed. $13.95
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A History of the 15th Missouri Cavalry Regiment, C.S.A.

Written and researched by Jerry Ponder. The 15th, seldom mentioned in Trans-Mississippi Civil War works, was brigade sized in strength and acted as the first line of defense for the Confederate Army over a wide area along the Missouri-Arkansas border. The book deals with the military records of this illustrious regiment and the social and political aspects within the region. Many gave their all and suffered great economic losses by their loyalty.

Soft-cover, 169 pages, includes a very good accurate roster of these men. $14.95. Great work!                                                                                                                                            

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Missouri Amnesty

By Carolyn Bartels. When the Civil War was all over in Missouri, the trouble was actually just beginning on the home-front, as the men returned to native soil. Some tragic stories, and some just what you would expect from those who applied for presidential amnesty in 1865 and 1866. Really it was determined, for a large part, on just who you knew. Great look at Missouri in those troubling reconstruction years.  The work includes 78 pages of text plus many photo-copies of old documents and letters; arranged alphabetically by name. $15.95                                                                                                                                               

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Missouri in 1861; The Civil War Letters of Franc B. Wilkie, Newspaper Correspondent

By Michael E. Banasik. Banasik and Camp Pope are to be congratulated. This is the best so far in this series of unwritten chapters of the Civil War. Although Wilkie accompanied an Iowa regiment, he told things in an unbiased manner, simply as they were within the subject. Banasik does his usual in-depth foot-notes, just full of additional information. This books fills in many gaps of early Missouri, such as campsites, locations, movements and everyday happenings dismissed as un-necessary in the official records. A MOST VALUABLE PIECE OF HISTORY! Soft-cover, rich in color. 276 pages plus a roster of the 1st Iowa. It has a very large and detailed biographical section. $19.95.

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Missouri Brothers in Gray

By Michael Banasik. The reminiscences and letters of brothers, William J. and John P. Bull provide readers with an unwritten chapter of history. Warm, wonderful, and a well written book. Softcover, index, photo’s. $13.95                                                                                                                                                  

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Missouri Confederates: A Guide to Sources for Confederate Soldiers and Units

By James McGhee. Jim is one of the most thorough researchers we have met. He co-authored 'Sterling Price's Lieutenants, and now has shared "Where to look for What in Missouri" with us. Missouri records, especially Confederate records are placed all over the state. Jim has gathered those records for each branch of the service, then by regiment. Excellent work!! $14.95

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Missouri Confederate Reports

Narrative reports of casualties after the battle of Cape Girardeau, Carthage, Hartville, Lexington, Marmaduke’s expedition 1862-1863, Price’s expedition of 1864, Newtonia and Wilson’s Creek. By Joanne Eakin. Included are register of Confederates who died in Federal prisons in Kansas City, Missouri; Fort Leavenworth and Fort Scott, in Kansas. Compiled from official battle reports; National Archives film. Soft-cover, 89 pgs, $13.00                                                                                                                                                   

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Missouri Confederate Surrender: Shreveport and New Orleans 1865

A listing compiled by Carolyn Bartels, of over 3000 names of those found on microfilm copy of the original surrender rolls. Gives name, rank, company. regiment and place of home residence in Missouri. Folks we don’t claim to have them all, just about 3,300 of them. Soft-cover, listed alphabetically, $13.00

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MissouriConfedDeaths.jpg (68563 bytes)

Missouri Confederate Deaths in Union Prisons and Their Hospitals                                                                                                                                                                         Way back in about 1911 or shortly thereafter, the families and the government needed to account for the thousands of missing Confederates who entered Union prisons across the northern states. In the attempt a massive undertaking was embarked upon to account for all these men by the prison journals. The entire journal held some 26,000 names, a far cry from actual deaths. We have extracted the men of Missouri from these records. The listing includes arrangement by name, rank, regiment, company, date of entry, death date and final disposition. Soft-cover, $9.00

EXCLUDED are Alton and St. Louis; For those see Joanne Eakin, Prisoners of War; Gratiot Street etc.

                                                                                                                                             

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Missouri Civil War Engagements

Over 1162 recorded events transpired within Civil War era in Missouri. We have listed the greater portion. Information was extracted from Official Records of the War of the Rebellion. Gives date and place of action and type. Soft-cover, stapled. $ 7.00. Don’t leave on vacation without it. Find the local sites.

                                                                                                                                                

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Missouri Confederate Pensions

Lists name, age, post office and county of residence, age at receiving pension, and in some cases the date of death of the applicant. Good reference work. Transcribed by Carolyn M. Bartels. $8.00                                                                                                                                               

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Missouri Officers and Gentlemen; Missouri CSA Surrender

Bartels found more men, who as residents of Missouri, were paroled at various Union depots in the South, during the months of May and June of 1865. Like its companion book Missouri Confederate Surrender; Shreveport, it contains names, rank, regiment and Mo. residence. An additional section of explanation by Richard Peterson (of Sterling Price’s Lts fame) on the various Missouri Artillery batteries found within the records. 32 pgs. Soft-cover.   $9.00

                                   

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Missouri Prisoners of War: Gratiot Street and Myrtle Street Prisons In St. Louis, Missouri and Alton, Ill.

This excellent work lists 16,000 plus names of those imprisoned for being a Southern soldier, ex-soldier a Southern sympathizing woman, or in some cases-for just speaking the wrong words! Record gives name, rank, or regiment, place of capture or residence and date of capture and disposition of the individual. Joanne Eakin, author, has added a 22 page history of the prisons. This book is "must have" for the serious Civil War researcher or history buff. In many cases, there is no doubt that this record is the last known record on many missing Missourians. Soft-cover, 302 pages, full of information. Listed by alphabetical order. $25.00                                                                                                                                                  

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Monroe County, Missouri, Chronicles of the Civil War

This book sets the scene and plays out many tragedies suffered by these citizens of Missouri. Included is the first military organizations which were organized in Monroe County and the trials that followed them. Written in about 1904 by James Farthing, it has been transcribed by Carolyn Bartels. Soft-cover. $10.95                                                                                                                                               

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Mountain Scouting

A Hand Book For Officers and Gentlemen

After service in the Indian Wars, Edward S. Farrow, set out to write a manual for soldiers and officers bound for the frontier army. This is the result. First published in 1881, it is a valuable instruction guide for wilderness hikers, accurate portrayal of the period, and id delightfully interesting. You will learn how to care for your horses, shoot accurately, fix broken bones, ward off diseases by the time ancient methods, proper equipment, bedding, tents, and the list goes on and on. 284 pages. Soft cover. $12.95

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Nine Months in the Infantry Service; The Civil War Journal of R. P. Matthews

The journal of R. P. Matthews, who later in life became a judge for Greene County, Missouri, details his service as a member of the John S. Phelps’ Regiment and Greene County Home Guard. These units are nine month units and many of its members later joined up with the 8th Missouri Volunteers Cavalry and the 24th Missouri Infantry, Phelps regiment was not involved during the battle at Wilson’s Creek, but went into the foray at Pea Ridge some months later. A great little book. $10.95                                                                                                                                               

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My Three years With Quantrill: As told by His Scout John McCorkle

Written from Mc Corkle’s own words by O. S. Barton. Mc Corkle was a young Missouri farmer of Southern sympathies who became a prominent and trusted member of Quantrill’s guerrilla band. Later in life, he, one of the fortunate to survive, went back to the peaceful pursuits of life, farming and raising a family. Excellent story. $17.95                                                                                                                            

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Noted Guerrillas

This famous old book, that was read with relish by thousands, following the Civil War, was first written by John Newman Edwards. Reprinted from an original copy by Two Trails Publishing. Joanne Eakin indexed the edition for added ease of wading through the flowery prose of the times of 1877 style. Wonderful account of the men who fought as Guerrilla’s in Missouri and some who followed the most famous generals within the Trans-Mississippi. You can readily see, after reading this, how some 250 men could hold at bay an entire Union army that occupied Missouri. The book, all 488 pages, is available in soft-cover at 24.95 and hard-cover for 36.95. 

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Peculiar Honor.jpg (200486 bytes) Peculiar Honor: A History of the 28th Texas Cavalry

by M. Jane Johansson                                

This deals with the regimental history of the 28th Texas (Dismounted) a unit of Walker’s Texas Division. This regiment fought in Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas in some of the fiercest, yet least-studied, battles of the Civil War.. Known as Walker’s Greyhounds they forged a legend in Texas military history. $19.95
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The 1862 Plot to Kidnap Jefferson Davis

By Victor Viquain. Edited by Jeffrey H. Smith & Philip Thos. Tucker. Accounts of a secret plot to kidnap President Jefferson Davis and strike a blow at the heart of the Confederacy. Hardcover, 256 pgs, 15 illus. Indexed. $24.95                                                                                                                                               

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Portals To Hell; Military Prisons of the Civil War

By Lonnie Speer. Northern newspapers, led by the local Rock Island Argus and carried by the New York Daily News, ran articles comparing the Rock Island Military Prison to some of the worst Southern prisons, later labeling it the Andersonville of the North. Powerful, shocking and an eye-opener to an issue long swept under the carpet by Union authorities. Hardcover, 410 pages, indexed. $34.95                                                                                                                                              

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Quantrill Celebrates Washington’s Birthday at Independence.. 1862 Style..

By Wayne Schnetzer. The Union forces under Lt. Nettleton had about 160 men and Parker and Quantrill with about 75 men met on the south side of the Square in front of Uhlinger’s Bakery on February 22, 1862. The fight that ensued was a most unique one, 12 pages, 5X6 inches $2.50                                                                                                                                            

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Quantrill’s Letters

By Joanne Eakin. Used many times in partial context, this is the first time that all known to exist have been copied verbatim and presented as a whole. Reading these poignant letters to his mother, gives us a different side of the man, unknown to thrill writers of today and yesterday. A new look at history. Soft-cover. $7.00                                                                                                                                               

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QuantrillBook.jpg (602972 bytes) Quantrill of Missouri: The Making of a Guerrilla Warrior

by: Paul R. Petersen                            

Much of the lore that was written about Quantrill was written after the conflict by those who opposed him, in other words written by the victors. A very different picture emerges of him when the actual records are studied. After all, here was a man that led hundreds of men into battle, a man mothers entrusted their sons to, a leader whose wounded were tended to by area women, and a man whose followers were very loyal. A new look at Quantrill through the eyes of a man raised in guerrilla country curious enough to delve for the truth. Hard Cover.504 pages.indexed. $26.95.
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Quantrill’s Company and Warrants Issued after the Burning of Lawrence

Compiled from National Archives microfilm by J. C. Eakin into booklet form, it includes a listing of Quantrill’s men from the Provost Marshal files, including some names that were spelled incorrectly or their service files were in error. A fine collection of miscellaneous documents and affidavits, such as the one from Joel Challis. In addition to these, the faces of some of Quantrill’s men were recognized by residents of Lawrence and for those known, a special warrant was issued, charging them with the crime, dated 18 Nov. 1863. 37 pages, soft-cover. $6.00                                                                                                                                               

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Quantrills Raiders in Texas.jpg (326578 bytes) Quantrill’s Raiders in Texas

by Evault Boswell                                  

"In the Lone Star State, the bushwhackers made camp at Mineral Creek" in the winter of 1863 and’64. This camp is well described in Mr. Boswell’s book; daily activities; hell-raising in Sherman; and even the robbing and killing of locals is included in this work. Includes appendix listing of those who rode with Quantrill; fully indexed169 pages. $24.95 soft cover.
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Quantrill’s Raiders

A listing by Carl Breihan and  Brophy   $4.50.                                                                                                                                             

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Quantrill's Thieves

By Joseph K. Houts. Joe was fortunate enough to have one of those ancestors that wrote down some very valuable history. The names that were found on the body of a dead guerrilla after the Battle of Sears Farm, near Pleasant Hill, Missouri. Recorded upon that list were the names of the men belonging to Quantrill's first company. Joes ancestor copied down those names. This generation has researched those names, finding family information and final dispositions of most of them. Excellent work and Mr. Houts is to be congratulated upon this wonderful piece of Missouri history. Beautiful colorful shiny cover adorns this soft-cover edition of 238+ pages, plus elaborate end-notes and documentation of resources, etc. Yours at a bargain price of $19.95. Well worth the money, and then some.

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Be sure to check R thru Z for more Quantrill related publications!